Defending the family honour?

Defending the family honour?

On November the 10th, at 21:00 in a full house, following the screening of Die Fremde, its director Feo Aladag answered questions from the public. The film deals with a number of issues: one of them was at the heart of an Amnesty International campaign on violence against women that touched Mrs Aladag. It concerns honour killings.
 
Up to 100,000 women each year die as a result of honour killings across the globe, according to UN estimates. But there are no accurate figures as this crime is often disguised as an accident or suicide. In countries and communities where it is socially accepted, the victim’s relatives, friends and neighbours rarely get involved and often look the other way. Honour killings are crimes and human rights violations, said Mrs Aladag, who wrote, directed and co-produced Die Fremde, one of the three 2010 LUX Prize contenders. She said she did a lot of research into honour killings before writing the script. In short, honour killings are not confined to the Islamic world, she explained. They are an ancient and archaic tradition that existed well before the world’s religions. Her story condemns nobody. She said she left a glimmer of hope of the missed opportunity for mutual reconciliation. She wanted her audience to feel empathy for all the characters trapped in this conflict. There are no winners even if such killings restore the family honour.
 
European Parliament written declaration demanding a European Year to fight violence against women (September 2010)

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