Akadimia Platonos (Plato's Academy) by Filippos Tsitos

Akadimia Platonos (Plato's Academy) by Filippos Tsitos

Filippos Tsitos said the theme of his film Akadimia Platonos chose him. “I have been always attracted to stories about disoriented males in their 50s. And for the Greeks, disorientation is a national disease.”
 
The film tells the story of Stavros, a kiosk owner, and his friends who idly pass the time watching passers by and criticizing foreign workers who, in contrast, are always on the move. The film takes place mainly in the same square expressing the characters’ immobility, their lethargy.  “The characters’ days are so similar that you don’t have the feeling that time moves forward.” But one day their routine is broken as Stavros’s mother throws herself into the arms of an Albanian worker – calling him her son, in Albanian. From then on Stavros’s friends view him with suspicion: is he Greek or Albanian? And Stavros is forced to examine his life, his identity and his values.

Mr Tsitsos said the film “tries to reflect the soul of a Greek man, the realization that his life is empty and his absurd need to define himself only through his nationality.” How can national identity embrace other cultures?  How can bridges be built between cultures? How does it feel to realize in midlife that you are not the person you thought?
 
Synopsis and trailer of Akadimia Platonos
Interview of Filippos Tsitos by Cineuropa